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Definition Of:

money

Bible DictionaryDictionary of Political Economy
Any generally accepted medium of exchange -- that is, anything which is generally acceptable in a particular society as a means of payment or of settling debts arising out of exchanges on credit. Put slightly differently, money is a very special sort of good for which a very large proportion of the demand (at the extreme, all of the demand) is derived from people's (realistic) expectations that it can be quickly and easily re-exchanged for some other more immediately desired good or service (rather than the demand arising from a desire to personally consume the money-good itself). The earliest forms of money arose spontaneously in barter economies when experienced traders identified certain commodities that were so widely desired for actual use in the society that they could reasonably count on their acceptability as payment in almost any trade. Monetary demand for such commodities was further enhanced if they also had other physical properties making them especially convenient to use for trade -- such as durability, portability, ease of storage, uniformity of quality, easy divisibility, and so on. That is, demand for these goods derived from their desireability as a medium of exchange was gradually "added on" to the pre-existing demand for them as objects of direct utility. Historical monetary systems have flourished on the basis not only of useful metals such as gold, silver, copper, bronze and iron but also on the basis of salt, tobacco, cattle and other livestock, furs and other animal hides, grain, gourds, beads, sea shells, feathers, and even transferable titles to particular coconut trees. In present day industrialized economies, money normally consists mostly of abstract claims on government or on heavily government-regulated banks ("fiat money") -- claims such as token coins and paper currency or central bank notes or even magnetic tape entries representing one's checking account balance at a government insured bank that theoretically entitles one to withdraw cash on demand. Historically such government sponsored currency usually originated as "IOU's" in which the government (or its central bank) promised to redeem the tokens on demand (perhaps only after some future deadline) with "real money" -- i.e., fixed quantities of gold, silver or what have you. However, government promises of redemption have by the 20th century largely been withdrawn or downwardly adjusted, and these tokens have very little (or no) intrinsic or use value. Nevertheless, in relatively "stable" countries (like the United States, Great Britain, Switzerland, Japan or Germany) fiat currencies remain generally acceptable as a means of payment because people think that they "know for sure" the currency can be used to satisfy their tax bills, because legal tender laws usually require private creditors to accept them to discharge contractual debts, and because people generally have come to believe through favorable past experience that the official government money will continue to be widely acceptable in exchange for an at least moderately predictable quantity of goods and services in the private markets in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, the confidence with which people hold their expectations about the future value of any given variety of fiat money is extremely fragile. More...
Bible DictionaryKnighthood & Chivalry Dictionary
{talk about the money economy} Portugal--- Portugal-- - Barbuda--a coin with the denomination of three dinheiros struck by Fernando I of Portugal between 1367 - 1383. - Bohemia-- - Bemish--A coin minted in Prague and worth approximately &frac12 of one English penny. - France-- - Blanc--A small silver coin used during the 14th century - Cadiere--billion coin struck by Charles VI of France - Flanders and Brabant-- - Botdragers--silver coins, the name coming from the helmeted lion on one side, also called the ‘potcarrier’. - Bryman--billon coinage equivilent to a double gros.
Bible DictionaryDictionary of Phobia
Fear of moneyAlso known as Chrematophobia
 
Fear of Swiss banks
 
Fear of wealth

 

Social Science Dictionary INDEX:


List of Terms: Terms beginning with "A", Page 1

Starts With:  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 3
Page Number:  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

A: Page 1 of 19.

AAGRA
AAR
ABOLFAZL SHADVAR
ABSOLUTE POVERTY
ACCRUED INTEREST
ACHIEVED STATUS
ACID RAIN
ACUTE DISEASE
ADAPTATION
ADJUSTED GROSS ...AERO
AFFIRMATIVE ACT...
AG
AGE GRADES
AGE STRUCTURE
AGEISM
AGENCIES OF SOC...AGRA
AGRARIAN SOCIET...AGRIBUSINESS
AIDS (Acquired ...
AIR POLLUTION
ALAA
ALIENATION
ANDROGYNY
ANIMISM
ANOMIA
ANOMIE
ANOMIE THEORY
ANTHROPOLOGY
APARTHEID
APEC
APG
APPROPRIATE TEC...ARMS RACE
ARMS TRADE
ARRANGED MARRIA...ASCRIBED STATUS
ASSET PROTECTIO...
ASSETS
ASSIMILATION
AUTHORITARIAN P...
AUTHORITY
AUTOCRATIC RULE
AUTOMATION
Abatement
Abbey
Abbot
Ability-to-Pay ...Ablutophobia
Absolute Advant...
Absolute advant...Abundance
Acarophobia
Accelerator
Acceptance
Acceptance-reje...
Accolade
Accoutrement
Acerophobia
Acheronophobia
Achluophobia
Acid Rain
Acousticophobia
Acquired Endowm...Acquittal
Acre
Acrophobia
Act of Parliame...
Acting Speaker
Active Alumni M...Adaptive Expect...
Additive
Address in Repl...Administrator o...
Admiral
Adoubement
Advance estimate
Adventurous Shi...Adverse Selecti...Aeroacrophobia
Aeronausiphobia
Aerophobia
Affection
Agency problem
Agency problem ...Agency problem ...
Aggregate Deman...Aggregate Expen...Aggregate Suppl...
Aggregate demand
Aggregate supply
Aggression
Agincourt, Batt...Agliophobia
Agoraphobia
Agraphobia
Agrizoophobia
Agyrophobia

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